Resource Database

  Filter by : Topic       Geographic      
Sort Search Results by : Title | Date

Report of the 6APPC

2013 The 6th Asian Pacific Population Conference, including the Asia-Pacific regional input for the special session of the General Assembly on the follow-up to the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development beyond 2014, took place in Bangkok from 16-20 September 2013.  The Senior Officials meeting was help on 16-18 September and the Ministerial Segment on 19-20 September.  APA and APA members ARI, IPPA, PPAT, MSI, AFPPD, IPPF ESEAOR, and ICOMP were among the approximately 70 civil society Observers at the 6 APPC. FPI a CSO representative in the New Zealand government delegation. Notable achievements at the 6APPC are inclusion of references to sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI), comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) for young people and a list of key affected populations (KAPs) in the HIV epidemic.  Read the report from the 6APPC here.

Read more

Topics

Advocacy

HIV/AIDS

ICPD

Young People and the Law in Asia and the Pacific

2013 Young people and the law in Asia and the Pacific: A review of laws and policies affecting young people’s access to sexual and reproductive health and HIV services is a collaborative effort between the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Youth Lead, the Asia-Pacific Network of Young Key Affected Populations.  This review aims to assess criminal laws, laws in relation to age, laws on health and HIV, law enforcement practices, and national policies relating to HIV, SRH and youth. In addition to describing laws, policies and practices that impede access to services, the review highlights examples of laws, policies and practices that are supportive of the rights of young people to access service. Poor access to SRH and HIV information, commodities such as condoms and contraceptives, and other services contribute to high levels of unplanned pregnancy and the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Child marriage is common in parts of the region, often accompanied with family and community pressure to bear children at a young age. Adolescent girls with unplanned pregnancies often seek abortion services from untrained practitioners in hazardous circumstances and unhygienic conditions due to limited access to safe and legal abortion in most of the region. One-third of unsafe abortions in the region occur in young women under age 25. There are multiple factors, including cultural, financial, logistical, institutional, legal and policy factors, that play a role in determining young people’s access to services. Some issues facing adolescents overlap with those facing adults in similar contexts, such as concerns about the distance to services, or embarrassment about needing, wanting or asking for SRH information and commodities. Other obstacles facing young people are unique to them, and influenced by their age and stage of life. For example, many adolescents and young people lack access to independent finances to purchase commodities or cover health care fees, insurance or transportation costs to services. Some have limited autonomy in decision-making, with decisions on whether they should seek care largely made by parents, spouses, in-laws and other gatekeepers. And in many settings, conservative views regarding adolescent sexual behaviour create reluctance among health care workers to provide information or services to young people. Read the Review here.  

Read more

Topics

Adolescents and Youth

Advocacy

HIV/AIDS

Emerging Economies and Global Development

2014 Common Goals and differential development explores the role of emerging economies and global development.   Authored by Neissan Alessandro Besharati, it explores the heated debate around ‘common goals and differential commitments’ in international development cooperation. It tries to capture the views and positions of the so-called ‘emerging economies’ on their role and contribution to global development and the post-2015 agenda. It explains the divergence between North-South and South-South cooperation with regard to their historical narratives, conceptual paradigms, delivery approaches, functions and capacity. It highlights the importance of standard-setting, monitoring, accountability and peer-review but it also explains the technical challenges and political tensions in bringing the ‘Southern providers’ into the regimes and systems led by the OECD-DAC and the current post-Busan Global Partnership. Read the article here.

Read more

Topics

Advocacy

The Right to Health in the Post-2015 Development Paradigm

2014   Anand Grover. United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health c/o Lawyers Collective, New Delhi, India. Correspondence: anandgrover@gmail.com The role of human rights norms and principles in achieving developmental goals is now recognized in many influential international declarations and resolutions. With respect to women’s health, the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) and the 1995 Beijing Platform for Action were instrumental in shifting the traditional focus from a population-centric approach to one that envisioned an expansive developmental agenda that enshrined gender equality and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) as critical aspects. Many of the strides made in this direction were, however, undone when the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) failed to adopt a broad reference to SRHR but limited the goal to reduction of maternal mortality (MDG 5). Although the MDGs may be credited for mobilizing global resources and partnerships for health, available funding was mainly for disease- specific MDGs like HIV, tuberculosis and malaria. Moreover, many have questioned the failure of the MDGs to consider the larger social context of development in the goal-setting approach. For example, even where countries were reported to be on track to achieving MDG 5, wide and persistent inequities between SHRH services for women in rural and urban areas have been found. In considering a post-2015 development agenda, therefore, it is important to imbibe the lessons learnt from past experiences into achieving more  holistic health outcomes. Anchoring developmental priorities in human rights can go a long way in addressing the lapses of the current framework, particularly in identifying progress indicators, whatever the frame- work to be adopted. 17 UN Special Rapporteurs have identified three priority areas predicated on a human rights approach to development to inform the agenda, each of which is particularly relevant for the fulfillment of the right to health. These are: reducing inequalities, national social protection floors, and double accountability.* Inequality Non-discrimination lies at the heart of a rights- based approach to health. Women suffer a greater disadvantage in the enjoyment of health facilities, goods and services due to their socio-economic status. Inequality in women ’s access to health services, including family planning and abortion services, including through legal restrictions, violates their right to the highest attainable standard of sexual and reproductive health.** In drawing up the post-2015 development agenda, States must recognize that gender equality and women' s access to health services, including sexual and reproductive health services, are crucial to reducing inequalities in all spheres of socio-economic development, health programmes and policies. National social protection floors Social security, including health security, is key to reducing inequities in health access. Inadequate public expenditure on health and over-reliance on out-of-pocket payments such as user fees, impoverishes millions of families every year. A right to health approach requires that social and  health insurance schemes reflect not only the health needs of the population, but also take into consideration the capacity of people to afford health care. Pooling of funds through pre-payment schemes that cross-subsidize financial risks across different groups protects the poor and vulnerable against catastrophic health expenses. Within the context of sexual and reproductive health, States have an obligation to not restrict coverage to a certain group or groups to the exclusion of others. For example, insurance schemes which cover maternal and child health and not SRHR services for adolescents or screening services for older women are discriminatory and a violation of the right to health. States must ensure that health insurance schemes adopt a holistic approach to women's health that covers all aspects of SRHR and all other aspects of health as well. Accountability through participation The health-related MDGs reflected a political will to tackle issues of global importance but were seen as ineffective in holding national and inter- national actors accountable for failures in meeting their commitments towards achieving the targets. Strengthening accountability through formulating effective legal remedies at the national level and through periodic reviews at the international level are, therefore, critical to holding countries responsible for their commitment to promote health-related post-2015 development goals. Effective community participation is also a critical aspect of ensuring accountability under the right to health approach. Community participation - especially of vulnerable groups – in all phases of decision-making processes to determine post-2015 development goals, targets and indicators and monitor their progress, both nationally and internationally, is necessary for their effective realisation and sustainability. Community participation will also ensure that States are ultimately responsible to the people, as they are in the best position to report instances of violations and failures by States. States must also establish stronger mechanisms to hold private businesses accountable, such as pharmaceutical companies and the food and beverage industry, which may limit access to essential medicines in the one case and directly or indirectly negatively affect health in the other.*** To ensure accountability and increase the visibility of the reasons behind limitations and/or failures in achieving existing development goals, it is necessary to look at the effect of the policies of inter-governmental and global institutions, all States, donors and private businesses on a global scale and not restrict this geographically. The whole system, as we presently know it, may have to be re-thought and overhauled in this regard. A Grover. Reproductive Health Matters 2013;21(42):41 *Statement by 17 Special Procedures mandate-holders of the Human Rights Council on the Post-2015 development agenda. United Nations Human Rights. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. 21 May 2013. http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=13341&LangID=E†A/HRC/66/254. 3 August 2013. http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N11/443/58/PDF/N1144358.pdf?OpenElement© 2013 Lawyers Collective, New Delhi, India Doi: **http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N11/443/58/PDF/N1144358.pdf?OpenElement ****A/HRC/23/42. 1 May 2013. http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/HRBodies/HRCouncil/RegularSession/Session23/A-HRC-23-42_en.pdf

Read more

Topics

APA Joint Statement at 47 CPD

2014 APA: Joint Statement at the 47th Commission on Population on Population and Development (CPD) APA delivered a joint oral statement on behalf of members on day 4 of the 47 Commission on Population and Development (CPD). Thursday, 10 April 2014,  in New York  at United Nations Headquarters. The statement, which was delivered by Alexandra Johns, APA Advocacy and Communications Officer,  follows: Honourable Chairperson, delegates and fellow advocates, The Asia Pacific Alliance for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (APA) is a network that brings together NGOs, donors and other stakeholders to ensure everyone’s right to health is fully achieved through the promotion and inclusion of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights. APA wishes to commend the progress made towards the ICPD Programme of Action (PoA), and the extension beyond 2014. We wish to highlight the strong role that Civil Society plays in its implementation. This 47th CPD is a vital opportunity to move the Cairo agenda forward. Asia and the Pacific is a highly diverse region with varying levels of development. Given this, we wish to strongly commend the leadership shown by our governments in their adoption of the ‘Asian and Pacific Declaration on Population and Development’ last September. We encourage member states to show the same fortitude and foresight over the next two days and urge that our priorities be reflected in the final outcome. Issues identified as priorities in the Asia Pacific Declaration include gender equality and women’s empowerment, and the fulfillment of sexual and reproductive health and rights for vulnerable and underserved groups as well as adolescents and young people. In particular, APA would like to highlight the need for comprehensive sexuality education, youth friendly services, and access to safe and legal abortion. Three quarters of the world’s poor live in countries classified as middle-income, and in our region, large numbers of people are being ‘left behind’ and lack fulfillment of their sexual and reproductive health and rights. As economies grow and international donors withdraw, inequality between and within countries also grows. We urge international donors to fulfill the target of 0.7% of Gross National Product for Official Development Assistance, and to ensure a human rights-based approach to development. Honourable Chairperson, we also underscore the need for a quality, comprehensive and integrated approach to SRHR – with universal access to services, education and information, and including male involvement. We emphasize the need to eradicate all forms of violence and discrimination based on age, sex, occupation, class, ethnicity, religion, disability, migrant or HIV status, sexual orientation and gender identity, or other. This necessitates the repeal and reform of any discriminatory laws, policies, practices and institutions. Gender based violence and sexual violence must be eliminated. Finally, it is critical to guarantee strong linkages between ICPD beyond 2014 and the Post-2015 Development Agenda. We urge Member States to be bold now and show leadership in addressing the unfinished agenda, and in particular, the new priority issues. Thank you.

Read more

Topics

Abortion

Adolescents and Youth

Advocacy

ICPD

SRHR & Post-2015 Briefing Cards

2014 A set of Briefing Cards on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) and the Post-2015 Development Agenda detail the linkages between sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and other key development issues including environmental sustainability, gender equality, economic growth, educational attainment, and broader health goals. The cards also contain recommendations for inclusion of SRHR in the post-2015 development framework. The briefing cards were developed by partners in the Universal Access Project. The cards aim to be useful for a wide range of advocates as we move toward intergovernmental negotiations and continue to make the case with governments about the importance of ensuring the comprehensive inclusion of sexual and reproductive health and rights within the post-2015 development framework. Access the briefing cards here.

Read more

Topics

Advocacy

State of the World Population 2014

2014 The Power of 1.8 Billion: Adolescent, Youth and the Transformation of the Future Young people matter. They matter because an unprecedented 1.8 billion youth are alive today, and because they are the shapers and leaders of our global future. They matter because they have inherent human rights that must be fulfilled. Yet, in a world of adult concerns, young people are often overlooked. This tendency cries out for urgent correction, because it imperils youth as well as economies and societies at large. Yet, in a world of adult concerns, young people are often overlooked. This tendency cries out for urgent correction,because it imperils youth as well as economies and societies at large. Youth in today’s large numbers may be improperly seen as a daunting challenge, a drain on scarce resources, or properly seen as the potential architects of a historic transformation in human well-being. Young people are our future The largest global youth population in human history will have a profound effect on every aspect of our common future and can create a better world for all. The effect can be overwhelmingly positive if young people are able to develop their capabilities, have access to education and health, including sexual and reproductive health, and find opportunities to fulfil the promise of their lives through, for example,decent employment. Access the Report here

Read more

Topics

Adolescents and Youth

Lessons From the First Cycle of the Universal Periodic Review: From Commitment to Action on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights

2014 The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a unique mechanism established by the United Nations General Assembly in 2006. This mechanism facilitates the review of the fulfilment by each United Nations Member State of its human rights obligations and commitments, with its full involvement, and with the objective of improving the human rights situation on the ground. The outcome of the review is a set of recommendations made to the State under Review (SuR) by reviewing States, the response of the SuR to each recommendation, as well as any voluntary commitments made by it during the review. After the review, the SuR has the primary responsibility to implement the UPR outcome. However, it may do so with the assistance of the United Nations system and participation of civil society, national human rights institutions (NHRIs) and other relevant stakeholders. The UPR is intended to complement and not duplicate or replace the work of other human rights mechanisms such as treaty bodies or special procedures. The UPR is largely considered a successful mechanism for its ability to bring to the fore human rights concerns in each country to empower civil society, including marginalized and excluded groups, to claim their human rights, and to bring substantial pressure to States to meet their human rights obligations. Due to its comprehensive scope covering the full range of human rights, the UPR provides a valuable opportunity to contribute to the realization of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). This publication, Lessons From the First Cycle of the Universal Periodic Review: From Commitment to Action on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights1, aims to explore the potential role the UPR mechanism can play in advancing the realization of SRHR at the global, regional and country levels. It assesses the attention the UPR has given to these issues during its first cycle and identifies ways to enhance this level of attention through all stages of the UPR process. Access the publication here.     

Read more

Topics

Adolescents and Youth

Don't Leave Communities Behind

2015 Civil Society Perspectives on Progress in Achieving Universal Access to HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support in Asia and the Pacific Civil society plays a key role in the HIV response in Asia and the Pacific. Communities most affected by HIV, namely: people living with HIV; sex workers; people who use drugs; gay men and other men who have sex with men; transgender people; migrants and mobile populations; prisoners; young key populations and key affected women and girls must remain a critical part of the response, and their role acknowledged and supported in political and funding commitments in 2015 and beyond.   This report outlines civil society responses to a survey prepared ahead of the UNESCAP Intergovernmental Meeting (IGM) on HIV/AIDS to be held in Bangkok on 28-30 January 2015. The report calls for governments and development partners to commit to: funding the HIV response sufficiently and sustainably grounding the HIV response upon evidence and human rights, and targeting it to the communities most affected by HIV removing all punitive laws and policies which act as barriers to effective HIV responses combating stigma and discrimination within health, social, law enforcement and legal settings at individual and policy levels; and supporting communities to play a lead role in policy and program design, service delivery, and advocacy. Access the CSO Survey Report "Don't Leave Communities Behind" here.

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Adolescents and Youth

Asian and Pacific Conference on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment: Beijing+20 Review

2015 The Asian and Pacific Conference on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment: Beijing+20 Review took place in Bangkok, Thailand on  17-20 November 2014, and convened by UN ESCAP in cooperation with UN Women.  The Conference, attended by 52 UN member States and 188 civil society organisations, identified remaining gaps and priority areas for action to accelerate the implementation of the Platform for Action in the region. Additionally, the “Asian and Pacific Ministerial Declaration on Advancing Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment” was adopted, by consensus. The Ministerial Declaration constitutes Asia-Pacific's input to the global review of progress in implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which will take place in 2015 at the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women, followed by a recommitment to the Platform for Action at the 2015 General Assembly session. Access the report from the meeting here.

Read more

Topics

Abortion

Adolescents and Youth

Advocacy

Global Policy Watch Factsheet

2015 2015 is a pivotal year. The post-2015 sustainable development agenda currently being drafted is premised on the reality that the present model of development is not working, given worsening inequalities and straining planetary boundaries. All countries and peoples—and the planet on which we depend–have the right to live with a better model, one that is inclusive and sustainable, starts a factsheet by Global Policy Watch on the Post-2015 and the Financing for Development process.  An increasingly urgent imperative for change informs the two–track negotiations unfolding at the United Nations from now until September. One track involves the post–2015 sustainable development agenda; the second focuses on financing for development, an independent process that began at the 2002 Monterrey Conference. While the two talks are separate, the issues in each are deeply interlinked, and the success of any new model depends on the outcomes of both.  The political stakes are high, but so are the opportunities - perhaps once-in-a-generation - for genuine transformation. Access the Factsheet here.  

Read more

Topics

ICPD

CSW Draft Political Declaration

2015 The Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)  has adopted a draft political declaration, as of 9 March 2015. The draft resolution was submitted by the Chair of the Commission on the Status of Women on the basis of informal consultations.  Read the Political Declaration on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women here.  

Read more

Topics

SDG Standards Table

2016 The following table identifies the human rights treaties and documents related to each Sustainable Development Goal (SDG), and has been produced by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).  Access the table here.

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Advocacy

Agenda 2030 and SDGs

Human Rights Instruments

Report of the Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment

2016 This report was prepared by Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, Juan E. Méndez, pursuant to Council resolution 25/13. It brings to light the gender perspectives on torture and other cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment.

Read more

Topics

Adolescents and Youth

Gender Equality and Empowerment

Human Rights Instruments

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights

Promising the World: Accountability and the SDGs

2016 Health and Human Rights Journal  From a human rights perspective, there is little doubt that the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a huge improvement on their predecessors, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). However, there is one critical area where it seems lessons from the MDG era have remained frustratingly unlearned: accountability.

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Agenda 2030 and SDGs

Human Rights Instruments

Unzipping Agenda 2030

2016 The brief "Unzipping Agenda 2030 for key affected women and girls in the HIV epidemic in Asia Pacific" aims to set out what Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development means for Key Affected Women and Girls (KAWG) in Asia and the Pacific. The brief looks at the relevance of Agenda 2030 to KAWG in the region. It outlines ways in which KAWG can advocate for issues pertaining to them, by making use of the follow-up and review processes for Agenda 2030; it also describes other opportunities for monitoring and tracking progress. The brief was produced by Unzip the Lips, a regional movement supported by a network of individuals and organizations working for the rights and meaningful participation of KAWG in the context of HIV and its intersections with gender issues.  Access the Brief here      

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Advocacy

Agenda 2030 and SDGs

Gender Equality and Empowerment

HIV/AIDS

Unzipping CEDAW

2016   The "Unzipping CEDAW: A Guide to the Rights of Key Affected Women and Girls in the HIV Epidemic in Asia Pacific" aims to promote the engagement of Key Affected Women and Girls, (KAWG) community networks and NGOs with the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). The goal is to advocate for the needs and rights of these groups, and to ensure that their sexual reproductive health and rights are respected, protected and fulfilled. The Guide was produced by Unzip the Lips, a regional movement supported by a network of individuals and organizations working for the rights and meaningful participation of KAWG in the context of HIV and its intersections with gender issues. Read the Guide here.  

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Advocacy

Gender Equality and Empowerment

HIV/AIDS

Human Rights Instruments

UPR SDG Scoping Summary

2016 The Asia Pacific Alliance for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (APA) conducted a sample scoping exercise to identify relevant human rights obligations and commitments related to sexual rights of 23 countries in Southeast Asia and the Pacific.i By making linkages with select Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets, this scoping may be used to inform advocacy efforts for the advancement of sexual rights at the national, regional and global levels. The scoping exercise covers recommendations made to countries within the universal periodic review (UPR)ii mechanism. The UPR is a process, under the umbrella of the UN Human Rights Council (HRC), which involves a review of the human rights record of each UN Member State. This includes other States making recommendations to the State under review about actions to take in order to improve the human rights situation within its territories. The first cycle of the UPR, which included a review of all States, on average, more than 1 in 4 recommendations pertained to sexual rights.iii Other human rights recommendations that might be used in advocacy efforts include: (i) the concluding observations of treaty monitoring bodies, such as the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, following a State’s review;iv (ii) the recommendations made by special procedures of the HRC, such as the Special Rapporteur on the right to health, in reports of country visits and thematic studies;v and (iii) resolutions of the HRC and the UN General Assembly, among others.vi It is hoped that this scoping exercise will inspire further similar exercises that include human rights recommendations from different mechanisms as relevant within a given country’s context.  Access the full Summary here.

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Agenda 2030 and SDGs

Human Rights Instruments

Ending AIDS in 2030: Do Not Leave Asia-Pacific Behind

2016 Asia Pacific Civil Society Statement for the 2016 High Level Meeting on HIV from 8-10 June 2016 Asia and the Pacific is home to the second highest number of people living with HIV after sub-Saharan Africa. Our culturally, politically and economically diverse region has an epidemic that is predominantly concentrated among key populations - men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people and people who use drugs - but also impacts heavily on women and girls, migrants, young people and adolescents, people in prisons, indigenous peoples, orphans, vulnerable children, and ageing populations. In 2011, two UN-ESCAP Resolutions1 called for regional action to achieve universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. Underlying these are specific calls for political leadership to amend or remove laws, policies and practices that fuel stigma and discrimination; ensure sufficient investment to sustain the response; address all forms of gender-based violence; and promote access to affordable medicines, diagnostics and vaccines. Resolution 67/9 also named key populations of people who use drugs, sex workers, men who have sex with men and transgender people. In 2013, governments in the region again committed to addressing policy and legal barriers for key affected populations, and furthermore to eliminating discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity and scaling up efforts to achieve Universal Access2.  In the five years since the last UN High Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS and the UN-ESCAP Resolutions, Asia and the Pacific has seen an overall reduction in new infections. However, concentrated epidemics among key populations in major cities continue to rise, with new infections rising by 3% between 2010 and 20143. Thirty cities in the region account for almost a quarter of al people living with HIV. While more people living with HIV have access to life-saving anti-retroviral drugs in the last five years, treatment access remains at 34% in the region, lower than the global average of 41%. Repressive laws, policies and practices that criminalize people who use drugs, sex workers, men who have sex with men and transgender people remain in place. These laws fuel violence, stigma and discrimination, increase exposure to human rights abuses and further heighten vulnerabilities. Discriminatory laws and policies also hinder access to services for adolescents, young people, women and migrants. Without an enabling environment, we cannot achieve effective service delivery nor reach the 90-90-90 treatment targets.  National investments in the HIV response have increased in Asia and the Pacific in the last five years. This illustrates the commitment of some governments in the region to fulfilling their citizens’ right to health and ensuring country ownership of the response. While expenditure is invested heavily in health service delivery and provision of treatment, newer classes of ART drugs and treatment options that have minimal side effects and ensure high quality of life of PLHIV are still not available. Co-infection with hepatitis C is also of increasing concern.  Middle-income countries are being excluded from price discounts and voluntary licenses by multinational pharmaceutical companies. Generic producing countries like India are under significant pressure from developed countries over their use of TRIPS flexibilities. We are very concerned with the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, which contains pro-IP provisions that threaten access to generic medicines. And currently,  Japan and Republic of Korea are demanding similar provisions for the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement, which covers 16 countries in our region.  Treatment is a crucial component of the response, but funding for prevention programmes, especially for key populations, remains the lowest priority in domestic financing. With the global shifts in financing of health and HIV programmes, we are alarmed that countries who are on the verge of transitioning to middle income economies will have less or zero access to external HIV financing especially for prevention – jeopardizing the initial gains in the HIV response, especially the work and contribution of communities and civil society.  Community organizations and networks of key populations are at the forefront of the HIV response in Asia and the Pacific. However, the political space for us to engage is shrinking due to stricter regulations, and ideological opposition, which undermines our capacity to engage meaningfully. Thus, we decry and protest the exclusion of Asia-Pacific Transgender Network (APTN) to participate in this High Level Meeting. As communities and civil society from the Asia-Pacific region, we ask Member States at this UN High Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS to: • Retain the naming of key populations, including transgender people, consistently throughout all relevant sections in the 2016 Political Declaration, especially in paragraphs that outline strategies and responses.• Commit to a roadmap towards decriminalization of key populations and removing age restrictions and parental and marital consent requirements for adolescents and young people.• Ensure universal access to comprehensive harm reduction, sexual and reproductive health and rights, HIV information services and comprehensive sexuality education for all.• Ensure implementation of prevention and care strategy for women and girls.• Commit to removing policies on HIV-related travel restrictions and deportation.• Establish a robust and systematic assessment of how countries fulfill its human rights obligations, including the right to health, especially for key populations and women and girls.• Commit to establishing funding mechanisms for civil society and critical enablers.• Develop sustainable mechanisms to ensure the availability, affordability and accessibility of treatment and diagnostics for HIV, TB, Hep-C and other co-infections in ALL low and middle-income countries.• Utilize all TRIPS flexibilities to prohibit evergreening, parallel imports and compulsory licenses. LDCs should use the TRIPS transition to 2021 and pharmaceuticals transition to 2033 and suspend IP barriers on generic medicines.• Remove TRIPS-plus provisions that negatively impact production of generic medicines; and remove all TRIPS-plus demands from the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.• Support and promote all efforts at local production of pharmaceuticals.• Provide an enabling environment and policy space for community and civil society to engage meaningfully in all aspects of the AIDS response, beyond just mere project implementers or beneficiaries. Access the  the full Statement here   

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Advocacy

HIV/AIDS

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights

Deliver for Women and Young People In South East Asia and the Pacific: Sexual Rights are Human Rights!

2016 Call to Action  Seventy-five sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocates and stakeholders comprising civil society representatives, parliamentarians and international development partners from South East Asia and the Pacific gathered in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 19 May 2016 for a Regional Caucus on Agenda 2030 and the fulfillment of sexual rights for women and young people. Held during the 4th Global Women Deliver Conference, the Caucus was organized by the Asia Pacific Alliance for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (APA) in collaboration with the Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (AFPPD) and Unzip the Lips. We commend the governments in our region for adopting Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), an ambitious global action plan with cross-cutting human rights principles of participation, equality and non-discrimination; that endeavors to reach those who are furthest behind first. The fulfillment of sexual rights is critical to enabling the full participation of all people in society, reducing inequalities, and to achieving just and sustainable development. Sexual rights include the right to a healthy sex life, the elimination of violence, discrimination and coercion on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression, and universal access to comprehensive sexuality education, all of which are intrinsic to achieving sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.Several countries in South East Asia and the Pacific have laws and policies that impinge on sexual rights by criminalizing consensual same-sex sexual conduct between adults, discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression, prohibiting or limiting access to safe abortion services, and including clauses that are barriers for adolescents and young people to access the full range of SRHR information and services. Sexual rights resonate across the integrated and cross-cutting SDGs, particularly to targets under Goals 3, 4, 5, 10 and 16 that relate to health, education, gender equality, reducing inequalities and partnerships. If countries in our region are to achieve the SDGs and ‘leave no one behind’, it is imperative that sustained efforts are made by governments by respecting, protecting and fulfilling the sexual health and rights of all persons. We call on governments in our region to be accountable for the achievement of the SDGs and ensure that the sexual rights of women and young people are fulfilled, by:➢ Fully engaging with the systematic, participatory and transparent follow-up and review process for Agenda 2030, including 1) support for and participation in the Asia Pacific Forum on Sustainable Development as the primary vehicle for addressing cross-regional challenges and sharing good practices, and 2) commitment to at least two voluntary national reviews at the High Level Political Forum (HLPF)➢ Enabling civil society to meaningfully contribute, monitor and review the implementation of the Agenda at all levels: sub-national, national, regional and global➢ Creating a national-level dialogue mechanism for Agenda 2030 between government and civil society, including community based organizations and indigenous groups, and ensure that it is a safe space for civil society➢ Enhancing the capacity of civil society and governments to engage with the Agenda 2030 follow-up and review processes.➢ Ensuring full implementation and commit national budgets to the SDGs, with an emphasis on Goals 3, 4, 5 10 and 16.➢ Reviewing the legal and policy frameworks for the health and human rights of women and young people, and amend where necessary. This requires, among other issues, ensuring that anti-discrimination laws, policies and guidelines are in place to create an enabling environment.➢ Removing all barriers for adolescents and young people, women including migrant women, and LGBTQIA to access SRHR information, education and services; and ensuring the availability of adolescent- and youth friendly services including full range of contraceptives, safe abortion, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), HIV treatment and mental health services.➢ Developing age-appropriate, gender and culturally sensitive curriculum and implementation of comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) for adolescents and young people both in and out of school. This should include trainings for teachers, parents and other educational institutions e.g. alternative learning systems.➢ Raising awareness of the human rights and needs of LGBTQIA with the general population, including through social media and other innovative platforms.➢ Investing in the engagement of private institutions and civil society as crucial partners in achieving sustainable development, with funds earmarked for youth-led organizations, community-based organizations, and indigenous groups, amongst others.➢ Ensuring access to safe and legal abortion information and services, including post-abortion care.➢ Collecting data on the practice of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) and taking steps to ban and eliminate the practice of FGM/C and protect women and girls from all such harmful practices.➢ Creating measures to provide clean water and sanitation to key populations through legislative and executive mechanisms of government with the gained support of the private sector and civil society.➢ Sensitization of religious scholars on human right issues, and sexual rights   Signatories: Aliansi Remaja Independen, Indonesia Aliansi Satu Visi (One Vision Alliance), Indonesia Alliance of Young Nurse Leaders and Advocates Inc, Philippines Asia Pacific Alliance for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (APA), Regional Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (AFPPD), Regional Burnet Institute, Australia CARE International, Global Family Planning Alliance Australia  Family Planning New South Wales, Australia  Family Planning New Zealand Global UNiTE Youth Network, Asia and Pacific, Regional Malaysian Council of Child Welfare, Malaysia Marie Stopes International, Global National Forum of Women with Disabilities National Committee For Children and Young People on HIV, Philippines Roots of Health, Philippines Rutgers WPF Indonesia, Indonesia Youth Peer Education Network Pilipinas (Y-PEER Pilipinas), the Philippines YouthLEAD (Asia Pacific Regional Network of Young Key Populations), Regional Women’s Plans Foundation, Australia   Individuals Ms Fathimath Waheeda, Facilitator for Life Skills and Peer Education (Republic of Maldives)

Read more

Topics

Accountability

Adolescents and Youth

Agenda 2030 and SDGs

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights


Latest Resources

To receive our updates

Subscribe Here


Enter Validation Code*